Fandom is my Fandom
Terri Windling writes:
“Years ago I wandered into Etherton Gallery in the downtown arts district of Tucson, Arizona, and found myself surrounded by the work of photographer/painter/collage artist Holly Roberts. I’d never encountered her art before and it hit me with the force of a revelation: glowing on the walls with colors so rich, yet so subtle, I could have stood there forever.
 I’m glad I first saw Robert’s work this way, for the reproductions in books and online — beautiful as they are — don’t begin to convey the power of the originals. Built up in layers of photography and paint, the images glimmer with an otherwordly light and contain hidden depths that reveal themselves slowly over time. Sometimes complex, sometimes simple as children’s drawings, and filled with mythic and personal resonances, they touched the same place in me as good magical realist fiction: highlighting the mystery of the everyday world.”
Read her entire post here.

Terri Windling writes:

Years ago I wandered into Etherton Gallery in the downtown arts district of Tucson, Arizona, and found myself surrounded by the work of photographer/painter/collage artist Holly Roberts. I’d never encountered her art before and it hit me with the force of a revelation: glowing on the walls with colors so rich, yet so subtle, I could have stood there forever.

I’m glad I first saw Robert’s work this way, for the reproductions in books and online — beautiful as they are — don’t begin to convey the power of the originals. Built up in layers of photography and paint, the images glimmer with an otherwordly light and contain hidden depths that reveal themselves slowly over time. Sometimes complex, sometimes simple as children’s drawings, and filled with mythic and personal resonances, they touched the same place in me as good magical realist fiction: highlighting the mystery of the everyday world.”

Read her entire post here.

stardustmote:

artbook-s:

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Announcing S: a Supernatural Artbook—-an artbook in tribute to the CW show, featuring never-before-seen artworks from over 30 incredibly talented artists.

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×PREORDER×

As suggested by the title, the themes of the book will be words starting…

x-cetra:

artisansoulleader:

thepowerofmoonlight:

Learnt an interesting thing today on this arabic course,
The original Arabic number system looked like this, the one we now use.
It was designed so each character had the corresponding number of angles to the number, so the number 1 has 1 angle, 2 has 2 angles, 3 has 3, 0 has none etc…
It is so obvious now, I’ve always assumed its one of those things that just is, with no logical explanation, but here it is, perfectly simple and satisfying

My jaw is legit on the floor right about now :D

THIS IS A HOAX based on some Europeans making shit up.  The so-called “original Arabic number system” wasn’t written like this:

(eastern, western Arabic numerals written right to left, 800-900 CE, from The Hindu-Arabic Numerals, David Eugene Smith, gutenberg e-text)
Nor were they originally Arabic. The Arabic mathematicians who introduced Hindi numerals to the west acknowledged their origins in their book titles:
Al-Khwarizmi - On the Calculation with Hindu Numerals (825 CE, original manuscript only survives in Latin translation, “Algoritmi de numero Indorum”)
Al-Kindi - Ketab fi Isti’mal al-‘Adad al-Hindi, “On the Use of the Hindu Numerals” (830 CE)
Kushyar ibn Labban - Kitab fi usul hisab al-hind “Principles of Hindu Reckoning"  

[x]
Here’s the number 260 in the Hindi script (“Gwalior”): 

Chaturbhuja Temple at Gwalior,  876 CE (CCarlstead, Creative Commons)

I checked snopes.com and they have not written anything up. But they should, cause math is fun!
http://www.pbase.com/inaturalist/arabic_numbers_hoax
http://message.snopes.com/showthread.php?t=49183
(as close as I could find)

x-cetra:

artisansoulleader:

thepowerofmoonlight:

Learnt an interesting thing today on this arabic course,

The original Arabic number system looked like this, the one we now use.

It was designed so each character had the corresponding number of angles to the number, so the number 1 has 1 angle, 2 has 2 angles, 3 has 3, 0 has none etc…

It is so obvious now, I’ve always assumed its one of those things that just is, with no logical explanation, but here it is, perfectly simple and satisfying

My jaw is legit on the floor right about now :D

THIS IS A HOAX based on some Europeans making shit up.  The so-called “original Arabic number system” wasn’t written like this:

(eastern, western Arabic numerals written right to left, 800-900 CE, from The Hindu-Arabic Numerals, David Eugene Smith, gutenberg e-text)

Nor were they originally Arabic. The Arabic mathematicians who introduced Hindi numerals to the west acknowledged their origins in their book titles:

  • Al-Khwarizmi - On the Calculation with Hindu Numerals (825 CE, original manuscript only survives in Latin translation, “Algoritmi de numero Indorum”)
  • Al-Kindi - Ketab fi Isti’mal al-‘Adad al-Hindi, “On the Use of the Hindu Numerals” (830 CE)
  • Kushyar ibn Labban - Kitab fi usul hisab al-hind “Principles of Hindu Reckoning 

[x]

Here’s the number 260 in the Hindi script (“Gwalior”): 

Chaturbhuja Temple at Gwalior,  876 CE (CCarlstead, Creative Commons)

I checked snopes.com and they have not written anything up. But they should, cause math is fun!

http://www.pbase.com/inaturalist/arabic_numbers_hoax

http://message.snopes.com/showthread.php?t=49183

(as close as I could find)

artisansoulleader:

thepowerofmoonlight:

Learnt an interesting thing today on this arabic course,
The original Arabic number system looked like this, the one we now use.
It was designed so each character had the corresponding number of angles to the number, so the number 1 has 1 angle, 2 has 2 angles, 3 has 3, 0 has none etc…
It is so obvious now, I’ve always assumed its one of those things that just is, with no logical explanation, but here it is, perfectly simple and satisfying

My jaw is legit on the floor right about now :D

artisansoulleader:

thepowerofmoonlight:

Learnt an interesting thing today on this arabic course,

The original Arabic number system looked like this, the one we now use.

It was designed so each character had the corresponding number of angles to the number, so the number 1 has 1 angle, 2 has 2 angles, 3 has 3, 0 has none etc…

It is so obvious now, I’ve always assumed its one of those things that just is, with no logical explanation, but here it is, perfectly simple and satisfying

My jaw is legit on the floor right about now :D

end0skeletal:

In case you are sad here are some animals wearing sweaters.

Digital Amnesia, a Dutch documentary on archives….
About the film:

Our memory is dissipating. Hard drives only last five years, a webpage is forever changing and there’s no machine left that reads 15-year old floppy disks. Digital data is vulnerable. Yet entire libraries are shredded and lost to budget cuts because we assume that everything can be found online. But is that really true? For the first time in history, we have the technological means to save our entire past, yet it seems to be going up in smoke. Will we suffer from collective amnesia? 

This VPRO Backlight documentary tracks down the amnesiac zeitgeist, starting at the Royal Tropical Institute in Amsterdam, whose world-famous 250-year old library was lost to budget cuts. Out of that event, 400,000 Books were saved from the shredder by Ismail Serageldin, director of the world-famous Library of Alexandria, who is turning the legendary library of classical antiquity into a new knowledge hub for the digital world.

Images as well as texts risk being lost in our current ‘Digital Dark Age’, but efforts to stave off this threat are under way! In an old McDonald’s restaurant in Mountain View, CA, retired NASA engineer Dennis Wingo is trying to retrieve the very first images of the moon. In upstate New York, Jason Scott has founded The Archive Team, a network of young activists that saves websites that are at risk of disappearing forever. In San Francisco, we visit Brewster Kahle’s Internet Archive that’s going against the trend to destroy archives, and the Long Now Foundation, which has put the long-term back on the agenda by building a clock that only ticks once a year and should last 10,000 years as an attempt to reconnect with generations thousands of years from now.


Directed by Bregtje van der Haak / produced by VPRO Backlight, The Netherlands

You can watch the Dutch episode here: http://tegenlicht.vpro.nl/afleveringen/2014-2015/digitaal-geheugenverlies.html
youtube version:  https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=NdZxI3nFVJs&feature=youtu.be

Good news bad news best news

sparkafterdark:

The good news:

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 I found my favorite old jacket while sorting through my old stuff

The bad news:imageThe last time I wore it I was nine years old

The best news:

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I am the anime now

itisnotaphase:

Banner by Bremo of a timeline showing different fannish platforms starting with Geocities and ending with AO3

  • At The Atlantic, Courtney Klauser discussed her education in social networks thanks to fandom…
  •   Corinne Duyvis wrote at YA Highway about lessons learned while roleplaying
  •   Author Peter David re-posted a poem about fandom he’d published in 2001 about the spread of fandom online…
  • Elizabeth Minkel wrote in New Statesman about changing times. “It might be easy to forget that a little more than a decade ago, Warner Brothers was yanking down Harry Potter fan sites without warning…”

peabodywunderkammer:

Here’s a look at the George Peabody Library’s collection of books and ephemera relating to The Great Exhibition at the Crystal Palace in 1851. First up is a lively chromolithograph of the Crystal Palace and its grounds, showcasing boating, carriage rides, and tourists taking in the sites.

Next we have a print of “Wot is to be” : or probable results of the industry of all nations in the year ‘51 : showing what is to be exhibited, who is to exhibit it : in short, how it’s all going to be done,” a look into the inner-workings of the great exhibition. This particular print showcases inventors with their patent machines for putting down revolutions, subduing Chartism, and grinding paupers’ noses. Of course, the real star of the print is the Prize Pig, because no exhibition would be complete without impressive farm animals!

The next two images are chromolithographic prints showing the Arms of All Nations (because we all know the world is comprised of nineteen countries) and the interior of the Crystal Palace’s exhibition hall.

For a more unique view of the Great Exhibition in the Crystal Palace, check out the Lane’s Telescopic View! This ‘Telescopic View’ is made of printed paper and card, and is supplied in a slip-in card box. When you view the internal scene through the little peep hole in the cover, you see a three dimensional view of the inside of the Crystal Palace in 1851, and the grand opening by Queen Victoria. Cool, right?

collegehumor:

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I’m Adam.

-And I’m Emily.

We make “funny videos” on the Internet.

-But soon, we might not be able to.

That’s because…

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…net neutrality is in jeopardy. Net Neutrality is the principle that says ISPs can’t discriminate between different types of traffic.

That means that…

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…whether you’re a bedroom music producer, a couple on an amateur porn site, or just someone with a start up idea - you get access to the same users as Netflix, Facebook or Amazon. On the Internet, anyone can succeed.

But…

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\

…America’s ISPs wanna set up a pay-for-play system where rich companies pay extra to get to those users first.

If this happens…

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…instead of a wonderful playground if innovation that it is now, the Internet will become like cable TV where you can only get stuff that’s been pre-approved by a bunch of old rich guys.

Ten years from now…

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…your Internet bill could be a bigger “fustercluck” than your cable bill.

Now, you might be thinking…

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…isn’t the government supposed to protect me from fragrant doucheholery like this?

Unfortunately…

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…the former chairman of the FCC (government agency that’s SUPPOSED to protect you) is now the cable industry’s head lobbyist. And another former cable industry lobbyist is now the CURRENT head of the FCC.

So…

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…we can’t trust the FCC to make the right decision on their own. That’s why WE need to protect the Internet we love. The chaotic, AWESOME, often quite weird, place where literally everyone’s voice can be heard.

In a few months…

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…the FCC will approve this festering soal of proposal unless we speak up. The Internet is one of the few places where human voices speak louder than money. So while that’s still the case, let’s use those voices. Go to DEARFCC.ORG and tell them to protect Net Neutrality. Thanks for doing your part to protect the Internet.

—-

Contact FCC at https://dearfcc.org/

IF DEARFCC.ORG IS DOWN, simply go to good oldhttp://www.savetheinternet.com/

All GIFS are courtesy of our new friend, RANDY!

—-

Source Video

itisnotaphase:

…In 2009, the final version of Ming’s library became known as The Fanzine Archives: A Library for the Preservation & Circulation of Fan-created Material. The Fanzine Archives became a federally recognized, non-profit organization dedicated to the preservation and circulation of fanzines. The Archives maintained an active circulating library of over 300 fanzines, and a permanent collection of over 3,000 titles.

We’ve talked here about online archives and the issues surrounding preservation, scanning, etc. old fanzines. So, I thought it would be cool to post about current archives for hard-copy fanzines which exist. This is the biggest one I know of (and I would have KILLED to be an archivist there, but alas it was not to be…).

The above link goes to the Fanlore wiki, but if you want to search the archives directly yourself, here is the link to the University of Iowa’s Special Collections Finding Aid. 

During the hey day of K/S fan fiction Spock’s penis came in a huge array of sizes and shapes. Gayle F was the Queen of The Bells - she had Spock with a penis that came in the shape of five bells, and that will always haunt me. And yet… ribbed… for Kirk’s pleasure. Hmm…
The classic fannon that was thoroughly adopted and turned up everywhere was the ‘double ridged’ penis. That is, Spock’s glans had a, er, kind of double echo thing, another set of ridges just underneath. A subtle nod to the alien penis and the fans’ love affair with same.
I’m pretty sure there were a load of self-lubricating penises in the stories - because you could so totally get away with that in fandom. And why not? A self-lubricating penis is logical, dammit, Jim!
There was one story (sadly, I never found this one, only heard about it in horrified whispers from friends) where Kirk had been raped and had developed a fear of penises (other people’s, one assumes, not his own), but that was just hunky dory as Spock didn’t have one. He, instead, had a hundred tiny tentacles that all sort of came together to do the job. How perfect is that? I wish I could find that story, because it’s just like mini-hentai! Hundreds of tiny tentacles! Adorable! Although I think it would make giving Spock head an adventure in eating spaghetti. “Hey, Kirk, you want parmesan on that?”
Oh, and there was this really great novel, I forget what it was called, but it was huge, where Spock’s nuts were on the inside. In fact, he may have had a couple of sets… no, wait, I remember, his nuts where accessible from the back, like, um, near his kidneys or something, so he really, really enjoyed massages, and then his scrotum just filled up with juice prior to coming. Or something. Anyway, it was hot. Back nuts.
My absolute favourite, though, was the extreme alien penis presented by Leslie Fish (Ah, Leslie, your zines are still my sugar bunny comfort fic). Spock’s genitals could best be described as a kind of hairy orchid. When he became aroused, the petals unfolded, revealing a studded (with emeralds) green shaft (again, ribbed for Kirk’s pleasure!), and two little whippy tentacles that just joyfully joined in the fun. [11]
He replaced the idea of wanting to be liked with the idea of becoming accomplished. Instead of being interested in being popular, he became interested in being intelligent. And instead of wanting to be powerful, he became interested in being useful.
He said to himself: ‘Not everyone will like me. But there will be those who will accept me just for what I am. I will develop myself to such a point of excellence, intelligence, and brilliance that I can see through any problem and deal with any crisis. I will become such a master of my own abilities and career that there will be a place for me. People of all races will need me and not be able to do without me.’ And that’s just what he did.
Leonard Nimoy, explaining how Spock dealt with prejudice aimed at his Vulcan-human parentage in response to a letter from a mixed-race girl struggling with real-world racism. (via finallyfrontiered)

amireal2u:

So my little history of fandom’s adaptability and why comment subject lines became such a big deal got really popular. That’s been kind of an experience. Wee!

I just wanted to say that I’ve noted more than a handful of people saying that we should write this stuff down. And they’re right, we…

heidi8:

deadtuesday:

super-sherlock-natural:

SPN FANDOM TRADITION: ALWAYS. REBLOG. ON. TUESDAY.
DO WANT THIS TRADITION TO STAY FOREVER IN THIS FANDOM
ALWAYS.









Never not reblogging on Tuesday.

January 15!

heidi8:

deadtuesday:

super-sherlock-natural:

SPN FANDOM TRADITION: ALWAYS. REBLOG. ON. TUESDAY.

DO WANT THIS TRADITION TO STAY FOREVER IN THIS FANDOM

ALWAYS.

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Never not reblogging on Tuesday.

January 15!

Sam Winchester & champagne